Posts Tagged ‘HTML5’

Even though its Flash technology is used as a punching bag by web-standards fans, Adobe has been building tools that embrace HTML5. The company recently released its own HTML5 video player, and Adobe Illustrator and Dreamweaver CS5 now contain a number of new HTML5 export tools.

Now it seems Flash might be joining the party. At Adobe’s MAX conference this week, Adobe engineer Rik Cabanier showed of a demo of tool that converts Flash animations to HTML5. (Well, technically it looks like a combination of HTML5, CSS and images.)

The video link, while not the best quality, shows the tool in action: YouTube Video

Adobe Flash has taken a beating the last couple of years. First Apple attacked Flash for poor performance, then open tools like HTML5, CSS 3 and JavaScript began stealing much of its thunder, offering video, audio and animation — traditional Flash strongholds — without the need for the free plug-in. [read]

A session titled “Flash Player 3D Future” will outline a future version of Flash that will be capable of playing 3D content, according to a program listing for the Adobe Max 2010 trade show, which will be held in Los Angeles October 23-27.

The session will take “a deep dive into the next-generation 3D API coming in a future version of Flash Player,” according to the listing. The Flash Player is available as a browser plug-in that allows users to play games or view multimedia content. Google’s YouTube uses both Flash and HTML5 for video distribution on its Website, but has recently come out in favor of Flash. [read]

As we all know, the battle between Flash and HTML5 for the future of online video is raging. But what about that other plugin some sites use for video? You know, the one made by Microsoft — Silverlight? A new posting tonight may call that platform’s future in video into question as well. Because arguably their most important client is looking to jump on the HTML5 video bandwagon: Netflix. [read]

IDG News Service — Despite concerns that it is far from being finished, HTML5 is ready for use, at least for most platforms and for most duties, asserted a Google (GOOG) developer.

“Depending on who you ask, HTML5 is already ready, or it won’t be ready until 2022,” said Google developer advocate Mark Pilgrim at the WWW2010 conference, being held this week in Raleigh, North Carolina. “The answer is both, depending on what your definition of ‘ready’ is.” [read]

flash_ipad_no_worky Adobe announced details of its Creative Suite of applications Monday amid a stormy debate over its relevancy and the vitality of Flash, one of its most important products. But even though the air around it has grown chilly and the skies above have darkened with menace, Adobe went ahead and held its big parade anyway. [read]

He waited a few days to make his point, but Adobe’s head software honcho has thrown a bucket of water onto the “Death of Flash” fire.

In a blog post Tuesday, Adobe CTO Kevin Lynch responded to Apple’s recent criticisms of the Flash platform and warned that a switch to HTML5 would throw users and content creators “back to the dark ages of video on the web.” Lynch went on to cite many of the same shortcomings of HTML5 video that we outlined in our post on the topic Monday.

First, here’s Lynch on Apple’s failure to support Flash on the iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad: [read]

The arrival of the Apple iPad is still months away, and already the tech pundits are declaring the demise of Flash.

The view is based largely on the fact that the iPad, like the iPhone, will likely not support Adobe’s plug-in, but it’s also a result of the enthusiasm surrounding the current momentum of HTML5. The emerging web standard, which is quickly being adopted by browser manufacturers and developers, offers native video playback and animation tools that don’t require Adobe’s Flash plug-in. Google recently added its significant weight to the HTML5 camp when it announced HTML5 video support for YouTube. That Apple appears to have again shunned Flash is simply more fuel for the anti-Flash fire.

At this point, however, the demise of Flash is anything but assured. Even if it does eventually fade away, Flash will still be with us for quite some time because there’s currently nothing to replace it with. [read]