Posts Tagged ‘Google’

Should you invest in TV, radio, billboards and other media where you can’t measure whether your ad works? Is an ad in New York magazine worth 1,000 times as much as a text link on Google? If you’re doing the comparison directly, that’s how much extra you’re paying if you’re only measuring direct web visits…

One school of thought is to measure everything. If you can’t measure it, don’t do it. This is the direct marketer method and there’s no doubt it can work.

There’s another thought, though: Most businesses (including your competitors) are afraid of big investments in unmeasurable media. Therefore, if you have the resources and the guts, it’s a home run waiting to be hit.

Ralph Lauren is a billion dollar brand. Totally unmeasurable. So are Revlon, LVMH, Donald Trump, Andersen Windows, Lady Gaga and hundreds of other mass market brands.

There are two things you should never do:

  1. Try to measure unmeasurable media and use that to make decisions. You’ll get it wrong. Sure, some sophisticated marketers get good hints from their measurements, but it’s still an art, not a science.
  2. Compromise on your investment. Small investments in unmeasurable media almost always fail. Go big or stay home.

And if you’re selling unmeasurable media? Don’t try to sell to people who are obsessed with measuring. You’ll waste your time and annoy the prospect at the same time.

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Another great post from Bobby Owsinski –

I’m not sure how this directly applies to music but it sure is fascinating. We think of the Web as everything that Google can find, but did you know that there’s a huge amount of data that’s not indexed or searchable?

It’s estimated that the size of the searchable Web is 167 terabytes (a terabyte is 1024 gigabytes) while the so-called “Invisible Web” or “Deep Web” is 91,000 terabytes!! Wow, that’s a lot of data that can’t be easily found.

Why isn’t this data available via Google? Google sends out spiders to regularly index websites, but there are some that require a password that just won’t allow that kind of access. These include private networks and library sties, which have huge amounts of information.

There are a number of ways to access the data of the “invisible web” though, and here are 10 search engines that are expert in just such a task, thanks to a great article on MakeUseOf. I’ll give you a brief overview here, but see the entire article for more detail.

PC World — One day I was using my cell phone’s GPS service to find the nearest Target. I was driving down the road when suddenly my cell phone piped up, “Turn right here.” I looked to the right. There was no road, just a tree and some grass. I chalked it up to a GPS glitch and turned right at the next corner.

If I had been Lauren Rosenberg, however, I would have turned right at that very moment, hit the tree, suffered some cuts and minor brain damage, and then turned around and sued Verizon for the glitch in its GPS service. [read CIO.com]

Say it ain’t so. . .

Here comes that Bing taking over iPhone search rumor again.  Techcrunch says,  “we’ve heard from mulitple sources, including a high level source who claims to have been briefed on the matter.”

Bing might very well be coming to the iPhone’s search bar.  But, just like you can use Yahoo or Google now, you’ll probably just have a third choice in Bing.  Which makes sense.  Businessweek mentioned the possibility earlier this year. [read]

Today at Google I/O Vic Gundotra made a big revelation. Last year, Google was activating 30,000 Android phones a day. The past February, that number jumped to 60,000. Today, Google is now activating over 100,000 Android phones a day.

Android was the second best-selling smartphone this quarter, Gundotra says. They are only behind RIM — and yes, ahead of that other rival. Gundotra also pointed out the stat from AdMob that Android was first in terms of web and app usage among smartphones. [read]

image from urbanchristiannews.com At its I/O Conference yesterday Google announced that it would open a store for paid and free web apps later this year. Outside deveopers will be able to sell via The Chrome Web Store which will support all major web platforms including Windows, Mac, Linux and of course, Google’s Chrome OS.

Why should the music industry care? Just as Apples iTunes App Store opened up new avenues to  deliver and monetize music, the Chrome Web Store will offers a new opportunity to reach a much larger set of potential customers – anyone with a computer or web enabled device. [read]

IDG News Service — Despite concerns that it is far from being finished, HTML5 is ready for use, at least for most platforms and for most duties, asserted a Google (GOOG) developer.

“Depending on who you ask, HTML5 is already ready, or it won’t be ready until 2022,” said Google developer advocate Mark Pilgrim at the WWW2010 conference, being held this week in Raleigh, North Carolina. “The answer is both, depending on what your definition of ‘ready’ is.” [read]