Archive for the ‘Success/Failure’ Category

One approach to innovation and brainstorming is to wait for the muse to appear, to hope that it alights on your shoulder, to be ready to write down whatever comes to you.

The other is to seek it out, will it to appear, train it to arrive on time and on command.

The first method plays into our fears. After all, if you’re not inspired, it’s not your fault if you don’t ship, it’s not your fault if you don’t do anything remarkable–hey, I don’t have any good ideas, you can’t expect me to speak up if I don’t have any good ideas…

The second method challenges the fear and announces that you’ve abandoned the resistance and instead prepared to ship. Your first idea might not be good, or even your second or your tenth, but once you dedicate yourself to this cycle, yes, in fact, you will ship and make a difference.

Simple example: start a blog and post once a day on how your favorite company can improve its products or its service. Do it every day for a month, one new, actionable idea each and every day. Within a few weeks, you’ll notice the change in the way you find, process and ship ideas. [Source: Seth Godin]

Dale Carnegie was a famous lecturer and writer as well as the developer of very popular courses in self-improvement, salesmanship, corporate training, interpersonal skills, and public speaking.

Dale wrote the first book I ever read (that I wasn’t required to read). The book was titled “How to Win Friends & Influence People.” I read the book when I was about 11 years old; this book was an incredible bestseller, and an amazing read.

Although born in poverty on a farm in Missouri, Dale Carnegie managed to become quite successful.

Dale authored popular books such as “How to Stop Worrying and Start Living,” and “Lincoln the Unknown,” as well as several other books. [read]

One of my favorite principles that he taught was that it’s possible to change other people’s behavior towards you by changing your reaction towards them. Give that some deep thought , apply it, and it alone can change your life. But there’s more to consider.