Archive for the ‘Productivity’ Category

Web professionals have been getting pretty excited lately, and it’s no surprise why. The latest spawn of Microsoft’s browser, Internet Explorer 9, has just been released. Many people have been talking about the changes and whether the latest version is a solid step forward, or if it’s too little, too late.

In a previous article, Jacob Gube (this site’s founder) had a more positive view of IE9. I’m here to play devil’s advocate and present the other side of the coin. [read]

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Joe Randeen – 3 Penguins Design

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less TV, more reading
less shopping, more outdoors
less clutter, more space
less rush, more slowness
less consuming, more creating
less junk, more real food
less busywork, more impact
less driving, more walking
less noise, more solitude
less focus on the future, more on the present
less work, more play
less worry, more smiles
breathe

There are three things that remind me of my father’s car: the Beach Boys, ChapStick, and a clock that is intentionally ten minutes fast. My father is one of those people who lives in his own time zone: Jeff Standard Time, sandwiched somewhere between Greenwich Mean and Mountain.

I used to tease my father for setting his clocks fast to try (and rarely succeed) at fooling himself into punctuality. Now I find myself doing the same thing. I know my alarm clock is set ten minutes fast, but there’s some glimmer of hope that in the fog between sleep and wakefulness, I’ll read the blaring red numbers, forget that I’m playing games with myself, jump out of bed, and get the proverbial early-bird worm. [read]

One approach to innovation and brainstorming is to wait for the muse to appear, to hope that it alights on your shoulder, to be ready to write down whatever comes to you.

The other is to seek it out, will it to appear, train it to arrive on time and on command.

The first method plays into our fears. After all, if you’re not inspired, it’s not your fault if you don’t ship, it’s not your fault if you don’t do anything remarkable–hey, I don’t have any good ideas, you can’t expect me to speak up if I don’t have any good ideas…

The second method challenges the fear and announces that you’ve abandoned the resistance and instead prepared to ship. Your first idea might not be good, or even your second or your tenth, but once you dedicate yourself to this cycle, yes, in fact, you will ship and make a difference.

Simple example: start a blog and post once a day on how your favorite company can improve its products or its service. Do it every day for a month, one new, actionable idea each and every day. Within a few weeks, you’ll notice the change in the way you find, process and ship ideas. [Source: Seth Godin]

At some point in our lives, most us have had some issues with procrastination. Perhaps it was while we were students, always leaving essays till the last minute. Maybe we struggle in the workplace, putting off reports and other big projects until they’re suddenly urgent. Or we might just find ourselves making little headway in our personal lives – never quite getting around to the things which we’d like to get done.

Procrastination never makes us happy. It’s not quality leisure time at all – it’s a guilty waste of time where we engage in low-value activities (like looking at funny videos of cats on YouTube) because we’re putting something off. And too much procrastination can have a seriously negative effect on our lives: it may cost us a promotion (or even a job), it may mean paying heavy fines or penalties, and it can make us feel miserable. [read]

Have you ever fallen into a black hole of comparison shopping? You’re looking for a new digital camera, for instance. You head over to Cnet.com and read some reviews of various cameras, watch the video demos, identify the model you want. Then perhaps you employ Google’s shopping search to price out the options and find the best deal. All of the sudden, it’s four hours later. You’ve found the perfect camera, but your purchasing triumph is tainted by a creeping feeling of, well, disgust. Couldn’t that time have been used better? [read]

Creativity is defined as the tendency to generate or recognize ideas, alternatives, or possibilities that may be useful in solving problems.

Have you ever watched children use their imagination? Children have the most amazing creative powers. They can utilize the most unusual things and make a kingdom out of it. So, what happened to us? Why did we stop being so creative? Some of the principal differences between us and children are that they haven’t yet been inhibited by family, institutions or society.

“Creativity involves breaking out of established patterns in order to look at things in a different way.“
— EDWARD DE BONO

I am going to deal with the most common problem in creativity. Our thinking! [read]