Archive for the ‘Design’ Category

Web professionals have been getting pretty excited lately, and it’s no surprise why. The latest spawn of Microsoft’s browser, Internet Explorer 9, has just been released. Many people have been talking about the changes and whether the latest version is a solid step forward, or if it’s too little, too late.

In a previous article, Jacob Gube (this site’s founder) had a more positive view of IE9. I’m here to play devil’s advocate and present the other side of the coin. [read]

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Joe Randeen – 3 Penguins Design

In the first part of this series, we discussed some fundamental concepts pertaining to CSS typography. Now we are going to cover some excellent techniques, tips, tricks and best practices for dealing with typography on websites.

This is the second part of a three-part series of guides on CSS typography that will cover everything from basic syntax to best practices and tools related to CSS typography. [read]

Even though its Flash technology is used as a punching bag by web-standards fans, Adobe has been building tools that embrace HTML5. The company recently released its own HTML5 video player, and Adobe Illustrator and Dreamweaver CS5 now contain a number of new HTML5 export tools.

Now it seems Flash might be joining the party. At Adobe’s MAX conference this week, Adobe engineer Rik Cabanier showed of a demo of tool that converts Flash animations to HTML5. (Well, technically it looks like a combination of HTML5, CSS and images.)

The video link, while not the best quality, shows the tool in action: YouTube Video

Adobe Flash has taken a beating the last couple of years. First Apple attacked Flash for poor performance, then open tools like HTML5, CSS 3 and JavaScript began stealing much of its thunder, offering video, audio and animation — traditional Flash strongholds — without the need for the free plug-in. [read]

Creative Commons License photo credit: quimby

These concepts can be translated into any creative field.

We usually see photography tips on the things we should be doing, so I thought it would be interesting to turn it around and look at the things photographers should not be doing.

The items in my list are not comprehensive by any means, but I find them to be fairly important with regard to most photographers out there. And of course, these are only suggestions and opinions… so don’t get too twisted up about them.

I got the idea for this title and article from a post at Daily Blog Tips called “10 Things Bloggers Should NOT Do“. Also worth a read for my fellow bloggers. [read]


Out of Bounds (OOB) is an interesting photo effect where the object or scene in the image seems to jump right out of the photo or its borders. It is a photo manipulation technique to add an illusion of 3-dimsnsionality to a flat photo. Getting an interesting OOB effect depends largely on the photo angle and the overall execution of the concept. It is lots of fun to create an OOB effect. You can use any photo editing software such as Photoshop or Gimp. With some imagination, creativity and basic photo editing knowledge you can create an amazing OOB image that captivates the viewer’s attention. This article showcases 50 most spectacular examples of Out of Bounds photo effects. We have also featured some excellent tutorials if you are interested in learning how to create this effect in Photoshop. So lets venture into this mesmerizing world where you will find creatures, people, and vehicles jumping right out of the screen. [read]

The airport in Minneapolis is expensive and reasonably thoughtful in its design.

But the signs are monochromatic. As a result, the tired traveler wanders in circles, looking for her destination. Imagine how much easier it would be to find out where you were going if every sign with the word TAXI on it had it in yellow instead of white. Once you knew the color of where you were going, you’d just naturally scan for it.

Google and our text-based low-res online world seems to argue against color as a signal, but it’s extraordinarily powerful. You don’t need to make a big deal of of it, subtle is enough. Make the button you want pressed green on every page. Soon, your users will naturally gravitate to green buttons…

This works in Powerpoint presentations and even contracts. A little goes a long way. [via Seth Godin]

We all know that gaining Twitter followers is down to how often you tweet and what you tweet about – or if you’re a website owner and use Twitter, a way to communicate with your readers. However, there are additional ways to increase the chances of new stumblers to follow you, one of them being by having an interesting background.

This isn’t a quick route to Twitter success, but it most certainly does help. By designing your own interesting Twitter background you can express your personality through images. One example is if you’re a creative person (which you probably are as you’re on Psdtuts+!) you would likely be able to put your skills to use and produce something beautiful that other creatives will appreciate. If they like your profile page, the chances are they’ll like your tweets, therefore following you! [read]